Family Relations

private mortgage

Helping the Kids Responsibly with Private Mortgages

Often a family member or child may need financial help.  This may involve the purchase or renovation of a home or some other need.  The person willing to may wish to help out but also wants to be repaid.  A solution may be a Private Mortgage.  This is where the parent loans the funds in a formal promissory note and uses a mortgage to secure payment.  This arrangement can have the following benefits:

  • Lower financing cost for the children compared to a commercial note & mortgage
  • Higher rate of return for the parents compared to certificate of deposit
  • Security for the parents in the event of default
  • The son or daughter can avoid many of the costs of a commercial loan & mortgage, including:
    • Origination fees
    • Inspections
    • Title insurance
    • Closing costs
  • A child with credit issues or unverifiable income may not qualify for a conventional loan
  • A Private Mortgage can protect the lender’s security from subsequent creditors’ liens
  • Parents can integrate the loan with their estate plan with debt forgiveness as part of the kid’s inheritance
  • If structured properly, the loan will not incur gift taxes
  • Flexibility, the note can provide for:
    • Interest only payments
    • Quarterly payments
    • Balloon payments
    • Payment upon the occurrence of a certain event

What you will need:

Promissory Note or Line of Credit Note

Mortgage Agreement

One Time Mortgage Tax to County Treasurer (sliding scale from 0.02% to 0.1% of the principal)

One Time Mortgage Certification to County Treasurer Fee $5.00

One Time County Clerk Recording Fee ($13 for 1st page and $2 for each additional page)

(A  $30,000 mortgage would cost about $55 in filing, certification and mortgage taxes.)

Expect about $500-700 for attorney’s preparation and review of documents.

Disadvantages:

Creation of a lender/borrower agreement may strain family relationships.

Foreclosure, if needed, can be expensive and damage family relationships

You must file IRS form 1098 and send a copy to the payer by January 31st of each year.

You must claim interest received as income.

wp_footer()
show
%d bloggers like this: